Currently I'm reading: Jenseits vom Tatort by Horst Brandt

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Peggy Farooqi
Mum of 3 (1994, 1995, 1998)- born in East Germany --lived in UK/ Kent since 1993 -- studied criminology -- love reading / writing / travelling / needlecraft 
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7 March 2014




Feature and Follow is hosted by Parajunkee & Alison Can Read. Head over to their blogs to check them out. 

Feature and Follow is exactly what it says… a weekly feature of a randomly chosen blog, and a question or a task for us to participate in. The aim is to get new followers to your blog and, of course, follow other blogs out there and get to know other bloggers, browse their blogs, leave comments and find stuff which interests you. For me, apart from books of course, this is what book blogging is all about - connect with others and chat about our favourite hobby.


The rules are all explained here in detail by Parajunkee. 



This weeks feature is a question:



Recommend some of your favorite back-list books – books that are at least a few years old (I’m thinking 5-10 years old rather than classics)
I have chosen 3 fiction books which I just love because I think they have all come up with something unique. 
1. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time by Mark Haddon
(first published 2003)



This book stands out for me and I always remember what great read it was for me. Maybe because I didn't think I would enjoy a book which has a child as a narrator. But young Christopher's story is something else all together and his view of an autistic boy who tries to understand the world around him when a neighbours dog apparently got killed made me understand and think about autism in a way which no academic book ever could. Hugely entertaining. 


2. Life of Pi by Yann Martel
(first published 2001)



Another book which did surprise me by how much I enjoyed it. I took to Pi straight away even before he ended up shipwrecked in the boat on the ocean with zoo animals as company and their quest for survival. Did I mention that one of the zoo animals is a Bengal tiger? Unique, sometimes weird and never boring.

1. The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold
(first published 2002)



Quote:
"My name was Salmon, like the fish; first name, Susie. I was fourteen when I was murdered on December 6, 1973."
What a fantastic idea for a book. And I learned from Susie Salmon that one day I may find my own personal heaven. (oh, and my daughter's teacher told her she should not be reading this, it is too dark - she was 14 at the time) 



And 2 non-fiction books which are kind of important to me.

1. On writing by Stephen King
(first published 2000)



Part memoir, part advice on writing, this is the book which I have probably read  most often. SK uniques style and humour. Love it!
Quote:
"Words have weight. Ask anyone who works in the shipping department of a book company warehouse, or in the storage room of a large bookstore."


2. Stasiland by Anna Funder (non-fiction)
(first published 2003)



This is slightly different, because it's kind of personal to me. I would usually try to keep all politics out of my blog, as it's just not the place IMHO. The author goes behind the Berlin Wall and tells us the human stories - tragic, moving, sometimes even almost funny. I was brought up behind the Berlin Wall and lived there for the first 21 years of m life. I only learned many of the things which went out with the Stasi (East German Secret Service) after the Wall came down.