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Peggy Farooqi
Mum of 3 (1994, 1995, 1998)- born in East Germany --lived in UK/ Kent since 1993 -- studied criminology -- love reading / writing / travelling / needlecraft 
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24 March 2014


Title
Opening the Book
Author
Rachel Van Riel and Olive Fowler
Publisher
Bradford Libraries
Publication Date
October 1996
Pages
128
Genre
books, reading
Finding a good read

Maybe not so much a review on this book, but rather an introduction and a reference, as I intend to use this book for a few more posts in the coming weeks. This book can be seen as a reading guide. It gives me as a reader loads to think about which I would like to share with my fellow readers / bloggers. And of course, I want to reference the book and give credit to the authors herewith. 

This is a non-fiction book for readers of all genres. 

We are all different readers. Some of us would simply give anything a go, others purely read one genre (too many books, too less time). Some of us give up if we don't get drawn in straight away, other will finish every book no matter how boring it may be. Some books will live with you long after the last page whether as others you might forget almost straight away. 

This book firstly makes us think about what kind of reader you consider yourself to be and what kind of books you like to read.What is your reading personality? What are your reading habits? Where does fiction fit into your life? Than it tells us to take a risk and try something different. But is it actually a good idea to read outside your usual genre? And where to start with the vast selection of books available? And maybe sometimes it is indeed better to give up on a book?

The second part of the book considers the different genres, tries to define them, introduces classical books, considers why readers may be drawn to that particular genre and what other genre/ cross genre one might try. 

Following genres are being explored:
  1. Reading Love
  2. Reading Crime
  3. Reading the Past
  4. Reading Violence 
  5. Reading Other Worlds
There is also a list at the end of the book with all the books which were mentioned within the chapters.

One thing to consider of course is that this guide was written in 1996, so it will only contain books published up to that stage.

I will publish another post later on this week when I want to introduce the different 'reader types'. Come by and see if you can recognise yourself.