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Peggy Farooqi
Mum of 3 (1994, 1995, 1998)- born in East Germany --lived in UK/ Kent since 1993 -- studied criminology -- love reading / writing / travelling / needlecraft 
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2 June 2014


Title
Beginner's Urdu Script
Author
Richard Delacy
Publisher
Teach Yourself Books - Hodder Headline
Publication Date
2001
Pages
122
Genre
Language Learning

Blurb:  

Do you want to learn the basics of reading and writing Urdu script? Would you like to be able to read Urdu signs, notices, advertisements and headlines? Are you planning to work in or visit an Urdu-speaking country? 
Richard Delacy has written a step-by-step introduction to reading and writing simple Urdu. This book features:
  • an introduction to the structure of Urdu words and expressions
  • an easy and accessible approach to learning the alphabet
  • hints of authentic handwriting skills
  • practical examples from real-life situations
  • useful and functional vocabulary

My review

This book does indeed keep what it promises on the title if you can put in a bit of work and time to literally 'Teach yourself'.

I started to learn Urdu as this is the mother tongue of my husband, and we visit Urdu-speaking countries . My personal experience is that if you would like to learn Urdu language, you ought to learn the script. It may look very complicated, but trust me, once you got the basics, it is actually quite straight forward. I don't read Urdu every day, in fact, I haven't read it for a year or so, but can still easily recognise the letters. 

The book starts off, as expected, with an introduction of Urdu script which may well go over your head at the beginning. But again, don't be put off by this, it will get better.The next section is the alphabet, and you will reference back to this again and again, so this page will need bookmarking! After that, 11 units will explain all letters in detail, grouped into similar letters. The writing of the letters is explained - and that is the writing as a single letter and also as a joining letter. I can only say it again, it will became easier as you go along and once you understood the concept of single letter / joined letter at the beginning, middle, end it will become easy. Pronunciation is explained in English words, but it may be best to have it spoken to you by a native speaker. Every Unit also contains writing and reading practice. The appendix contains numbers, dates, days of the week, months.

The book does have some vocabulary, but this is more to give an example of the writing rather than to learn vocabulary, so for serious learning, you will need an additional book. This book deals with the script.

The print of the letters is large and easy to see. I had a bit of trouble keeping the paperback book open so used a bulldog clip.